In this issue's guest interview, Arnold discusses Century Management's bottom-up, value based investment approach, which looks toward absolute value in order to provide clients with consistent investment results. Arnold discusses top investment ideas, which include chemical and fertilizer companies benefiting from the natural gas revolution, as well as technology companies exposed to the manufacturing renaissance in the U.S.

Arnold Van Den Berg is highlighted alongside legendary investors including:

  • Benjamin Graham
  • Peter Lynch
  • Sir John Templeton
  • Warren Buffett
  • Walter J. Schloss
  • Thomas Rowe Price

This exclusive and thought-provoking book by Magnus Angenfelt will be released soon in the U.S. by Roos & Tegnér.

Jim Brilliant, Co-Chief Investment Officer, is featured in the Spring 2013 issue of The Wall Street Transcript. In this issue's guest interview, Jim discusses finding deep value by identifying structural industry changes. He describes the firm's investment philosophy as a deep-value, bottom-up strategy focused on all cap sizes, how it analyzes both industry drivers and the structural health of an industry when determining stock values, and how it employs a worst-case analysis when choosing stocks.

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Arnold Van Den Berg, CEO and Co-Chief Investment Officer, is featured in the spring 2013 issue of Money Manager Review. In this issue's guest interview, Arnold discusses CM's approach to value investing, if he expects high inflation in the near future, and whether or not the market is cheap or expensive.

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In a troubled financial market, the Benjamin Graham Value Approach keeps certain investors secure.

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Was published in the April 30, 2004 issue of Outstanding Investor Digest. This 18-page PDF was excerpted from a talk given by Arnold Van Den Berg to Century Management clients in January of 2004. "Since founding Century Management back in 1974, Arnie Van Den Berg has handily beaten all of the indices. Through March 31,2004, he's managed to earn returns of 17.6% per year before fees versus 13.9% and 12.8% per year for the S&P 500 and the NASDAQ respectively..."

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"The ultimate value of a company is the present value of its future cash flows."

The ultimate value of a company is the present value of its future cash flows. However, this most basic concept sometimes gets overlooked by many investors, as they simply look for companies with recognizable names or that are in the current spotlight as places to invest without regard for the companies' future earning power and growth rate.

Most people say, "I just want the best stocks". However, this can be interpreted several ways. We find many people that invest refer to the "best stocks" to mean stocks of high investment quality. Other people use the words "best stocks" to mean having a good short-term outlook or that have gone up the most. When we use the term "best stocks", we mean simply the best values. That is to say, those stocks whose market prices are lowest in relation to their intrinsic or private market value.